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Inventory number

Provv.8589, Cat.1954

  • Document
  • Writing Recto
  • Writing Verso

General description

Papyrus with protection spells and a drawing of a pharaoh

Cat. 1954 + Provv. 8589 are four fragments of a papyrus from the New Kingdom, containing on the recto two columns of protective spells. Although both columns are only partially preserved, it is still possible to obtain some information about the content. The text mentions an “enemy”, which is the evil entity to be defeated. Gods such as Re and Thoth are mentioned as well. As often happens in this type of text, the snake for Apophis, as well as the other snakes in the papyrus, have knives stuck in them: red knives on black snakes and vice versa. On the verso, there is a drawing of king Ramesses IX, at least according to the cartouche. The pharaoh is depicted standing, with his chest leaning forward and his arms, though not completely preserved, probably in the act of offering something which is also not preserved. He wears the royal insignia Kheperesh-crown with the uraeus-snake, the usekh-collar and some bracelets.

Epoch

New Kingdom (1539-1077 BC)

Dynasty

Dynasty 20 (1190-1077 BC)

Pharaoh

Ramesses IX (Neferkare Setepenre)

Provenance

Thebes/Deir el-Medina (?)

Acquisition: Drovetti, Bernardino (?)

Acquisition Date: 1824 (?)

Joining object(s) (log into TPOP)

Image(s)

Image

  • Text 1

Editor

Andrea Fanciulli (AF)

Script

hieratic

Text type

Magical

Keywords

protection, snake, religion, enemy

Epoch

New Kingdom (1539-1077 BC)

Dynasty

Dynasty 20 (1190-1077 BC)

Pharaoh

Ramesses IX (Neferkare Setepenre)

Drawing

No

Drawing description

---

Image

  • Text 1

Editor

Andrea Fanciulli (AF)

Script

hieroglyphs

Text type

Drawing, Caption

Epoch

New Kingdom (1539-1077 BC)

Dynasty

Dynasty 20 (1190-1077 BC)

Pharaoh

Ramesses IX (Neferkare Setepenre)

Drawing

Yes

Drawing description

On the verso, there is a drawing of king Ramesses IX, at least according to the cartouche. The pharaoh is depicted standing, with the chest leaning forward and the arms, not completely preserved, probably in the act of offering something which is also not preserved. He wears the royal insignia Kheperesh-crown with the uraeus-snake, the usekh-collar and some bracelets.

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